Want to make unit testing easier? Check out Fluent Assertions. You can add this library to your C# Unit Tests in .NET Framework or .NET Core. To be clear, I’m just a fan of this library and I am not involved with it in any way.

Instead of assertions like these:

Assert.Equal(5, result.Count)

Assert.Equal(firstName, result)

Isn’t this better?

result.Count.Should().Be(5)

result.Should().Be(firstName)

But that’s just the start. There is plenty more to see. In this 5 Minute video, I’ll show you what you need to get started, it is really simple.

 

If you like this video, please subscribe to my YouTube Channel: youtube.com/schwammystreams

I am writing this as part of a series of posts all about the benefits a developer gets from being a part of a developer community. I’ve personally put a lot into my own developer communities and I have gotten a tremendous amount out of it in return. In each of these posts, I’ll list a benefit of being involved in a developer community. If you aren’t involved yet, I hope you will be soon. I’ll list some ways to get involved below…

First, what is a developer community?

In most industries, people refer to their business network. The network is made up of connections that you build over time, get to know, and support. Often, developers say we belong to a developer “community” and I think that is such a nicer idea. A community cares about each other and a community helps each other.

Today’s Benefit: Confidence

A community can give you confidence

Earlier in my career I joined a local user group. As I continued to get more and more involved in the group, my focus was on sponsors and prizes for events. We were able to get so much free stuff to give a way so in those days my nickname was “Swag Man”. I was building a pretty good reputation for myself and I was speaking at a variety of user groups. I knew the local community leaders, I knew the speakers, and I knew the vendors/sponsors. My personal network was growing. I’d routinely hear comments like “When are you going to come work for me” and “If you are ever looking for a job, just give me a call.” Many of these people didn’t really know my skills as a developer. But they knew I was passionate. And they knew me because I showed up and I was there. Hearing these comments often, I was able to have confidence at work. Confidence to make hard choices sometimes and stick to my principles. The kind of confidence that let’s you think “I’m going to do this the right way” and “I can speak up and tell the boss when they are wrong” and things like that. And guess what? Most of the time, that paid off because I did things the right way and in the end, my employers appreciated it. But if I didn’t have confidence in my career, I probably would have played it safe.

Want to join a developer community?

Join your local developer meetup. You can find tons of them on meetup.com

A local meetup is a great place to learn and build your own network. Don’t be shy. Introduce yourself to the people sitting next to you. Many people there are looking to network and build a community but they just don’t know how to do it. So take the first step. Say “Hi”. And don’t be afraid to ask questions. The speakers spend a lot of time prepping material to present and are happy to talk with you about it.

Join an online community – lots of the same benefits without leaving your chair!

The latest wave in the Developer Community: Live Streaming & Live Coding

While gamers have been streaming for a while, developers have recently realized that live streaming platforms are great for our kind of content too. The great part of Live Streaming is that the audience can really participate and join the conversation. Via the comments, viewers can ask questions, make suggestions, and even joke around with the host, all Live during the stream. This makes the stream very interactive and people actually get to know one another through participation. What makes Live Coding so interesting is that it tends to be unscripted. The sessions often end up like “paired programming” or even “group programming” with the viewers getting their ideas into the mix. While there are many developers doing live streaming, I am personally involved in two different projects

Schwammy Streams: Wednesdays at Noon Eastern Standard Time

Coding, Fun, and a Bit of Chaos

This is a solo project but I plan to invite guests on to code with me! I try to keep the show to about an hour since it is over lunch. I hope you will join me while we build this new, online, community together. On the stream, we are building some simple software but treating it like a professional project. It’s built with some of my favorite patterns, it has unit testing, DevOps, and more. In time it will get more and more features to demonstrate various frameworks and libraries. I even hope to have several UIs for the application so I can play with Angular, React, Vue, Blazor, and any other framework. The basic API is written with C# and ASP.NET Core.

To make it easier for viewers, I am streaming on 3 different platforms. Please join me on which ever you like:

The Dev Talk Show: Wednesdays at 8:30PM Eastern Standard Time (sometimes 9pm start)

Developers doing what developers do, recorded during a live stream.

This show is loads of fun. I cohost the show with my friends Chris Gomez and Rich Ross and we talk about all kinds of stuff that’s of interest to developers. We invite you to join our online community for conversations about anything from C# features to how to lead a dev team. We typically throw in demos and live coding too. We have guests from time to time and we love when viewers join in via the stream chat sharing their own opinions, questions and comments. We usually stream live from the Microsoft MTC in Malvern, PA where there is a really cool studio. And sometimes we are all remote.

We typically stream out on multiple platforms as well but occasionally (due to some technical limitations) only Mixer.

There are many great developer streams to choose from

If my style or content, isn’t right for you, find a stream that meets your needs. Search the web or ask your friends and peers which streams they like. Here are a few other recommendations:

I am writing this as part of a series of posts all about the benefits a developer gets from being a part of a developer community. I’ve personally put a lot into my own developer communities and I have gotten a tremendous amount out of it in return. In each of these posts, I’ll list a benefit of being involved in a developer community. If you aren’t involved yet, I hope you will be soon. I’ll list some ways to get involved below…

First, what is a developer community?

In most industries, people refer to their business network. The network is made up of connections that you build over time, get to know, and support. Often, developers say we belong to a developer “community” and I think that is such a nicer idea. A community cares about each other and a community helps each other.

Today’s Benefit: Learning

When you share knowledge with the community, you learn a lot yourself

Of course, if you attend meetups you are likely to learn a lot from the presentations. But you can learn even more by getting more involved and doing the presentations yourself! With the group I joined early in my career, there was a lot of encouragement for us to volunteer to speak at the meetings. I remember feeling like I didn’t know enough to be a presenter and I certainly wasn’t an expert at any of this. And I heard the advice, the same advice I give to potential speakers now. Just pick a topic, start planning a presentation, and learn the parts you don’t know. Advice I was given was don’t to worry if you aren’t an expert, if you prepare, you will know more than anyone else in the room. Sooner or later I got the courage to do a presentation. I really can’t remember what my the topic was but I know I was nervous. And I recall that I learned a ton in the process. Since then, I have done so many presentations. Each one is a learning experience for me. Sometimes I learn by prepping my content and diving into the topic deeper than I previously had done. Sometimes I learn from the questions I get during the talks. Sometimes I learn through suggestions from the audience. But there is always something learned.

Want to join a developer community?

Join your local developer meetup. You can find tons of them on meetup.com

A local meetup is a great place to learn and build your own network. Don’t be shy. Introduce yourself to the people sitting next to you. Many people there are looking to network and build a community but they just don’t know how to do it. So take the first step. Say “Hi”. And don’t be afraid to ask questions. The speakers spend a lot of time prepping material to present and are happy to talk with you about it.

Join an online community – lots of the same benefits without leaving your chair!

The latest wave in the Developer Community: Live Streaming & Live Coding

While gamers have been streaming for a while, developers have recently realized that live streaming platforms are great for our kind of content too. The great part of Live Streaming is that the audience can really participate and join the conversation. Via the comments, viewers can ask questions, make suggestions, and even joke around with the host, all Live during the stream. This makes the stream very interactive and people actually get to know one another through participation. What makes Live Coding so interesting is that it tends to be unscripted. The sessions often end up like “paired programming” or even “group programming” with the viewers getting their ideas into the mix. While there are many developers doing live streaming, I am personally involved in two different projects

Schwammy Streams: Wednesdays at Noon Eastern Standard Time

Coding, Fun, and a Bit of Chaos

This is a solo project but I plan to invite guests on to code with me! I try to keep the show to about an hour since it is over lunch. I hope you will join me while we build this new, online, community together. On the stream, we are building some simple software but treating it like a professional project. It’s built with some of my favorite patterns, it has unit testing, DevOps, and more. In time it will get more and more features to demonstrate various frameworks and libraries. I even hope to have several UIs for the application so I can play with Angular, React, Vue, Blazor, and any other framework. The basic API is written with C# and ASP.NET Core.

To make it easier for viewers, I am streaming on 3 different platforms. Please join me on which ever you like:

The Dev Talk Show: Wednesdays at 8:30PM Eastern Standard Time (sometimes 9pm start)

Developers doing what developers do, recorded during a live stream.

This show is loads of fun. I cohost the show with my friends Chris Gomez and Rich Ross and we talk about all kinds of stuff that’s of interest to developers. We invite you to join our online community for conversations about anything from C# features to how to lead a dev team. We typically throw in demos and live coding too. We have guests from time to time and we love when viewers join in via the stream chat sharing their own opinions, questions and comments. We usually stream live from the Microsoft MTC in Malvern, PA where there is a really cool studio. And sometimes we are all remote.

We typically stream out on multiple platforms as well but occasionally (due to some technical limitations) only Mixer.

There are many great developer streams to choose from

If my style or content, isn’t right for you, find a stream that meets your needs. Search the web or ask your friends and peers which streams they like. Here are a few other recommendations:

I am writing this as part of a series of posts all about the benefits a developer gets from being a part of a developer community. I’ve personally put a lot into my own developer communities and I have gotten a tremendous amount out of it in return. In each of these posts, I’ll list a benefit of being involved in a developer community. If you aren’t involved yet, I hope you will be soon. I’ll list some ways to get involved below…

First, what is a developer community?

In most industries, people refer to their business network. The network is made up of connections that you build over time, get to know, and support. Often, developers say we belong to a developer “community” and I think that is such a nicer idea. A community cares about each other and a community helps each other.

Today’s Benefit: Motivation

A community of your peers can be very motivating

Early in my career I joined Philly.NET, my local .NET User Group (user groups are now known as “MeetUps” Smile). I remember thinking how amazing it was that people would come to these meetings and teach me for free, just because they liked sharing information! Before long, I started making friends at the meetings. I got to know the organizers, the regulars that attended all the meetings, and the presenters. We’d often keep talking out in the parking lot after a meeting ended and sometimes we’d get drinks afterwards. It was great to talk with people who were passionate about their work, just like I was. As a matter of fact, it made me even more passionate about my work! Meeting people who were really smart and really good at their work inspired me to keep learning, to keep trying new things, and to improve my skills. I was really motivated to grow as a developer. And it was great to have the comradery of people who ran into the same problems as I did. In our business, it is pretty easy to feel like a failure. You can spend days trying to solve seemingly simple problems and easily doubt yourself. But having this group of friends with similar interests and experience helped me realize that all developers have struggles and they all get stuck.

Want to join a developer community?

Join your local developer meetup. You can find tons of them on meetup.com

A local meetup is a great place to learn and build your own network. Don’t be shy. Introduce yourself to the people sitting next to you. Many people there are looking to network and build a community but they just don’t know how to do it. So take the first step. Say “Hi”. And don’t be afraid to ask questions. The speakers spend a lot of time prepping material to present and are happy to talk with you about it.

Join an online community – lots of the same benefits without leaving your chair!

The latest wave in the Developer Community: Live Streaming & Live Coding

While gamers have been streaming for a while, developers have recently realized that live streaming platforms are great for our kind of content too. The great part of Live Streaming is that the audience can really participate and join the conversation. Via the comments, viewers can ask questions, make suggestions, and even joke around with the host, all Live during the stream. This makes the stream very interactive and people actually get to know one another through participation. What makes Live Coding so interesting is that it tends to be unscripted. The sessions often end up like “paired programming” or even “group programming” with the viewers getting their ideas into the mix. While there are many developers doing live streaming, I am personally involved in two different projects

Schwammy Streams: Wednesdays at Noon Eastern Standard Time

Coding, Fun, and a Bit of Chaos

This is a solo project but I plan to invite guests on to code with me! I try to keep the show to about an hour since it is over lunch. I hope you will join me while we build this new, online, community together. On the stream, we are building some simple software but treating it like a professional project. It’s built with some of my favorite patterns, it has unit testing, DevOps, and more. In time it will get more and more features to demonstrate various frameworks and libraries. I even hope to have several UIs for the application so I can play with Angular, React, Vue, Blazor, and any other framework. The basic API is written with C# and ASP.NET Core.

To make it easier for viewers, I am streaming on 3 different platforms. Please join me on which ever you like:

The Dev Talk Show: Wednesdays at 8:30PM Eastern Standard Time (sometimes 9pm start)

Developers doing what developers do, recorded during a live stream.

This show is loads of fun. I cohost the show with my friends Chris Gomez and Rich Ross and we talk about all kinds of stuff that’s of interest to developers. We invite you to join our online community for conversations about anything from C# features to how to lead a dev team. We typically throw in demos and live coding too. We have guests from time to time and we love when viewers join in via the stream chat sharing their own opinions, questions and comments. We usually stream live from the Microsoft MTC in Malvern, PA where there is a really cool studio. And sometimes we are all remote.

We typically stream out on multiple platforms as well but occasionally (due to some technical limitations) only Mixer.

There are many great developer streams to choose from

If my style or content, isn’t right for you, find a stream that meets your needs. Search the web or ask your friends and peers which streams they like. Here are a few other recommendations:

I’m getting really excited for TechBash 2019. Before you know it, we’ll have loads of developers descend on the Poconos to learn, network, and have fun! I figured I would compile a list of some of the great reasons to attend TechBash. If you are on the fence, I think this will do the trick!

TechBash is Nov 12-15 2019 at the Kalahari Resort in Pocono Manor, PA.

Please see www.techbash.com for more details.

Sessions/Content

20181003_090623Of course, the main reason to attend any technical conference has to be the content! We’ve got plenty of it. What do you want to learn? We’ve got languages (C#, Go, JavaScript, etc.), Client Side stuff (Angular, React, Vue, Web Components, PWAs, CSS, etc.), Azure, DevOps, .NET Core, Azure, Testing, Machine Learning, and AI. We cover ASP.NET, .NET Core, and Entity Framework. Plus, there is more to our careers than just tech, so we help you out with soft skills to including sessions on Imposter Syndrome, Hiring, and Diversity and Inclusion. The list goes on and on. Check out our schedule at https://techbash.com/2019-schedule

Speakers

I can’t say enough good things about the talented professionals that travel to TechBash to share their expertise with you! We bring in a diverse group of speakers from around the world, some representing top companies and products too. Many of these speakers do this simply because it is their passion. We are lucky to be a part of this great community.

Workshops

This year we are lucky to have 4 awesome workshops. I must mention, the workshops cost extra but they are well worth the price. In these workshops, you get a deep dive into a topic and often get hands on experience too. This kind of learning can only be possible with a full-day workshop!

From Zero to Hero with Azure DevOps presented by Paul Hacker – DevOps Architect at Microsoft

Modernizing Your Apps to .NET Core / .NET 5 presented by Sean Killeen – .NET Specialty Lead, Excella

Intro to Web Components presented by John Riviello – Distinguished Engineer at Comcast & Chris Lorenzo – Distinguished Engineer at Comcast

Doing more with Serverless on Azure presented by Rich Ross – MTC Technology Architect (Microsoft) and amateur live-streamer

Water Slides

barrellingbaboon768x432Ok, it is up to you whether or not you tell your boss this part, but TechBash isn’t just about learning new tech. TechBash is FUN! TechBash is hosted at the Kalahari Resort in the Pennsylvania Poconos – a 220,000 square foot indoor water park! Bring a bathing suit.

Code of Conduct & Emphasis on Diversity

You may think it is odd that I list a code of conduct on the list of things that makes TechBash great. But we have established a forum for attendees, speakers, sponsors, and staff to all come together and feel comfortable knowing that they will all be respected. We are pretty proud of that. This year we are even hosting a panel on diversity. We want this kind of environment to spread from our event to your workplace!

Family Day Content

Bring the family along to TechBash! While you are learning, they can explore the waterpark and other great activities at the Kalahari and the surrounding area. And on Friday, we’ll provide lots for the kids to do. Take the kids out of school for the day, they’ll learn a lot with many STEM topics.

Lego Open Build, Gaming, Martial Arts, A Reptile Show, Application Development Workshop, Engineering Challenge, and more!

Attendee Party

20181003_203606Once again, I am talking about fun. But networking is an important part of our careers. Please join us for the evening attendee party, have some fun, meet your peers, and relax! If the weather is good, we’ll open the doors and enjoy the fire pits and fresh air on the patio.

Game Night

20181004_194200OK, when my colleagues suggested that we have game night at TechBash, I was a bit unsure about the idea. But I was really wrong about this. Game night is really fun. Attendees are all welcome down at the lounge for board games, card games, ping pong, giant Jenga and much more. We’ll have some snacks and a cash bar. If the weather is nice, we’ll have fire pits and corn hole outside.

Food

20181004_144058It’s a conference but we’ve got to eat too! Our attendees have consistently commented that TechBash has the best food and snacks of any conference. We can’t take much credit for that but we are lucky the Kalahari chef’s do such a great job.

Location

The organizers of TechBash started this conference because we were tired of traveling across the country for Tech events. So we put this conference together close to where millions of people live and work – the northeast. TechBash is less than 2 hours from NYC and Philly. That makes it a pretty easy drive from Albany, Baltimore and Harrisburg and many more areas too.

Water Slides

Yeah, I know I said this already. But seriously, the indoor water park is 220,000 square feet! It is insane and loads of fun.

Keynote

We’ve had great keynote speakers in the past and 2019 is no exception. This year, we’ve got Jeffrey T, Fritz, Senior Program Manager in Microsoft’s Developer Division. You may also know him from his very popular live stream show on Twitch: Fritz and Friends. Jeff has a huge following on line and he has earned it by delivering top notch content.

Attendee Lounge and “The Hallway” Track

20181003_203606Many people say you learn the most at a tech conference in the hallway. In the hallway, you can meet up with presenters, ask follow up questions and keep learning. We’ve taken that to the next level by providing an awesome space for networking, collaboration, and relaxation – the Attendee Lounge. Relax on the couch or get some fresh air on the patio. Meet up with old friends and new.

Live Stream and Recorded Content

We’ll even be live streaming some of the content from TechBash! So if you can’t make it, I hope you will catch a session on line. And if you attend one of the recorded sessions, it’s great to be able to re-play it later at home for review. Of course, it’s best to be here in person where you can ask questions and interact Smile.

Tesla Chargers

OK, this may not be that important to you but I recently bought a Tesla. I just found out the Kalahari has Tesla chargers on site! I’m told that the chargers are part of the valet parking service which is $30 per night. I’ve also read online where the Kalahari may waive the fee for some “charging only” situations but I make no guarantees. Either way, I’ll be getting a charge.